February Portrait ….

February Portrait ~ Emily Dickinson.

AN AMETHYST REMEMBRANCE

I held a jewel in my fingers

and  went to sleep.

The day was warm, and winds were prosy;

I said: “Twill Keep.”

I woke and chid my honest finger,-

The gem was gone;

And now an amethyst remembrance

Is all I own.

Poetry Emily Dickinson An Amethyst remembrance Tasha Tudor Rosemary for remembrance February leap year New England Buttry shelf Almanac

a sweet little picture from my book ‘Rosemary for Remembrance’ by Tasha Tudor. I hope your February leap year day is warm and your winds are prosy!

 

Emily Dickinson was born on December 10, 1830, in Amherst, Massachusetts. Throughout her life, she seldom left her home and visitors were few. The people with whom she did come in contact, however, had an enormous impact on her poetry. She was particularly stirred by the Reverend Charles Wadsworth, whom she first met on a trip to Philadelphia. He left for the West Coast shortly after a visit to her home in 1860, and some critics believe his departure gave rise to the heartsick flow of verse from Dickinson in the years that followed. While it is certain that he was an important figure in her life, it is not clear that their relationship was romantic—she called him “my closest earthly friend.”

By the 1860s, Dickinson lived in almost complete isolation from the outside world, but actively maintained many correspondences and read widely. She spent a great deal of this time with her family. Her father, Edward Dickinson, was actively involved in state and national politics, serving in Congress for one term. Her brother, Austin, who attended law school and became an attorney, lived next door with his wife, Susan Gilbert. Dickinson’s younger sister, Lavinia, also lived at home for her entire life in similar isolation. Lavinia and Austin were not only family, but intellectual companions for Dickinson during her lifetime.

While Dickinson was extremely prolific as a poet and regularly enclosed poems in letters to friends, she was not publicly recognized during her lifetime. The first volume of her work was published posthumously in 1890 and the last in 1955. She died in Amherst in 1886.

February Portrait Emily Dickson leap year special unique touches letter writing

While I do not enclose poetry in my cards and letters I am known to include some dried petals. What fun when you open a letter and petal sprinkle out. I sometimes add little white ‘ feathery’ dove feathers!! My Gran- daughters love it!! Do you add special little touches to your mail?? This little water color posy is by Tasha Tudor and can be found in her book ‘Rosemary for Remembrance’

Upon her death, Dickinson’s family discovered forty handbound volumes of nearly 1,800 poems, or “fascicles” as they are sometimes called. Dickinson assembled these booklets by folding and sewing five or six sheets of stationery paper and copying what seem to be final versions of poems. The handwritten poems show a variety of dash-like marks of various sizes and directions (some are even vertical). The poems were initially unbound and published according to the aesthetics of her many early editors, who removed her unusual and varied dashes, replacing them with traditional punctuation. The current standard version of her poems replaces her dashes with an en-dash, which is a closer typographical approximation to her intention. The original order of the poems was not restored until 1981, when Ralph W. Franklin used the physical evidence of the paper itself to restore her intended order, relying on smudge marks, needle punctures, and other clues to reassemble the packets. Since then, many critics have argued that there is a thematic unity in these small collections, rather than their order being simply chronological or convenient. The Manuscript Books of Emily Dickinson (Belknap Press, 1981) is the only volume that keeps the order intact.

Some information on Emily Dickinson was found at:

https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/emily-dickinson and at  Wikipedia.

Emily Dickinson was a jewel indeed and so is the book – ‘The New England Butt’ry shelf Almanac. By Mary Mason Campbell. Emily is featured for February’s portrait, February’s flower is the Amaranth, as I shared in my last post.

February Portrait Bird ~ THE SONG SPARROW

The most optimistic and hopeful bird we know is the Song Sparrow, who arrives in the garden – if indeed he has ever left it- to sing his first Song of Spring in the wintry cold and dark of February.

`The New England Butt’ry Almanac by Mary Mason Campbell

I sit and hear the blithe song-sparrow sing

His strain of rapture not to be suppressed…..

That song of perfect trust, of perfect cheer,

Courageous, constant, free of doubt or fear.

~Celia Thaxter

We have some lovely little sparrow living about us. They serenade Mitzy and I on our promenades. We also have doves that coo to us in the morning and a cardinal couple who sing to us from the trees out back as we sit in our rocking chair sipping  our tea. What lovely feathered friends to you have about you?

FEBRUARY ~ Portrait – Tea Time Delectable

~ Rosemary Butter –

~ Mother’s Ginger Tea Cakes

~ Quaker Maids

~Apricot filled cookies

~Doubles Chocolate Tea Cakes

~Gillian’s Tea Loaf

You can find the recipes for these delectables in the book – ‘The New England Butt’ry Shelf Almanac’ By Mary Mason Campbell & Tasha Tudor

Happy leap year to you. I know I’m glad I had an extra day!!

You can find many of the books I mention in my post at:

http://tashatudorandfamily.com/

Please note all content and photos of this blog, F.B. and etsy shop are copyright@2016 by Melissa O’Connor. Please do not remove with out my permission.

Thank you very much to those who ask, I enjoy working with you!

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Fair- Maids of February

FEBRUARY ~ from ‘The Country Diary Of An Edwardian Lady’

~One month is past , another has begun…..Hartley Coleridge

~ February bring no rain ‘Tis neither good for grass nor grain.

~ “In February, if thou hearest thunder,Thou shalt see a summer wonder”

~’ If Candlemas Day be fair & bright –  Winter will have another flight – But if Candlemas Day be clouds & rain – Winter is gone & will not come again.’

How was your Candlemas Day / Groundhog day? It was indeed fair & bright here and today we are having a little bit more winter like weather –  cool and rainy. Perfect weather for knitting and drinking tea.

Fair Maids of February Poetry Lord Alfred Tennyson The Country Diary of an Edwardian Lady Elegantlyhandmade,woedpress.com

Fair – Maids of February.
Snow drops.

The Snowdrops

Many, many welcomes,
February fair-maid,
Ever as of old time,
Solitary firstling,
Coming in the cold time,
Prophet of the gay time,
Prophet of the May time,
Prophet of the roses,
Many, many welcomes,
February fair-maid!     ~ Lord Alfred Tennysen

 

Speaking of flowers…. some say the violet is the birth flower of February. According to ‘The New England Butt’ry Shelf Almanac’ the birthstone is Amethyst and the flower is Amaranth!?   Hmm, now I have heard of Amaranth as bird seed and even a health food and flour alternative but not as a flower representing a month of the year.

It is said that the ancient gods wore wreaths of it ; and Milton in his Paradise Lost crowns angels with it. Its meaning to the ancients was Immortality or Unfading Love.  ~ “The New England Butt’ry Shelf Almanac”

Amaranth Flower

Amaranth Flower

A quick google search led me here; http://flowerinfo.org/amaranth-flowers

The amaranth flower is a genus of roughly 60 species, which are all considered cosmopolitan. These annual herbs, which are native to North and South America, can grow between 1 to 6 feet in height, and are thought to be very long-lasting plants. This flower, which is a member of the amaranthaceae family and amaranthoideae subfamily, is made up of a small inflorescence which blossoms from an either drooping or erect spike. Their colors range from the well-known crimson red, to purple and even golden hues. Amaranth are thought to be very hardy plants which are resistant to most diseases; however, they are susceptible to frost, and are best grown in warmer weather.

The amaranth flower is one of the most useful blossoms around. These plants are not only loved for their ornamental applications, but also for their use as a food source, dye and medicine……

 

The language of the VIOLET = Humility, modesty, devotion, faithfulness

Fair maids of February Valentines Day February Day flowers Poetry of February elegantlyhandmade.wordpress.com

Violets

The Lost Love ~

A violet by a mossy stone
Half-hidden from the eye!-
Fair as a star, when only one
Is shining in the sky.

~William Wordsworth

Rosemary for Remembrance Victorian language of flowers William Wordsworth The lost love poetry Tasha Tudor Valentines elegantlyhandmade.wordpress.com

One of my little violets with a Tasha Tudor drawing of a pretty bouquet of flower. From Tasha’s book ‘Rosemary for Remembrance’ .  This picture and post will be the remembrance of the violet I accidentally plucked. I tried to pluck off the spent violets and this happened!

The Victorian Language of flowers Violets Rose geranium lavender jasmine calendula poetry Christina Rossetti American violet society elegnatlyhandmade.wordpress.com

My handmade sachets contain both flowers that I have collected and dried with some that I purchase from my local health store.  I like to include free sachets with a  purchase from my etsy shops. The brooch in this photo was purchased from my vintage shop; soeleganlyvintage.etsy.com. This customer also purchased my PDF shawl pattern from my eleganlyhandmade.etsy.com shop.

The language of my sachets :

~ Lavender = Devotion, luck, housewifely virtue, acknowledgment

~ Pink Rose Petals = bashful love –  love, victory,pride

~ Jasmine Petal = Grace, elegance, amiability

~ Rose (Attar) Geranium = Preference

The Language of Herbs

“Plants have a language of the creator intended for our translations” ~ Louis Agassiz

~From ‘A Basket of Herbs’ By Tasha Tudor and Mary Mason Campbell

 

 Poetry Violets language of flowers elegantlyhandmade.wordpress.com Tasha Tudor language of flowers elegantlyhandmade.etsy.com

She was as sweet as violets in the spring…..
~Christina Rossetti

Who Hath Despised The Day OF Small Things?

As violets so be I recluse and sweet,
Cheerful as daisies unaccounted rare,
Still sunward-gazing from a lowly seat,
Still sweetening wintry air.

While half-awakened Spring lags incomplete,
While lofty forest trees tower bleak and bare,
Daisies and violets own remotest heat
And bloom and make them fair.

~ Christina Rossetti
I found this poem, along with more poems about the violet by Christina Rossetti Here:
Sweet Heart Valentines Day Red Tasha Tudor Style Cottage Elegance Kindred Spirit Vermont Wool mohair Hand knit shawl PDF Pattern elegantlyhandmade.etsty.com

My Lovely  “Cottage Elegance Sweet Heart Valentines Day Berry Red Shawl”  hand knit by me with cozy soft Vermont wool and Mohair yarn. I will offer this shawl on sale for the month of February – It is ready to ship. Enter coupon code 1TAKEJOY2015  at check out to receive 15 % off.  OR……

It’s the perfect time of year to sit by the fire and knit your own shawl Tasha Tudor Style “Cottage Elegance Kindred Spirit Shawl” So it a lovely time to offer a SALE for my PDF PATTERN.

Tasha Tudor style hand knit shawl pattern sale elegantlyhandmade.etsy.com Valentines day Fevuary Sweet Heart sale

February PDF Pattern sale 20 % OFF enter coupon code ( starts with Numeral 1)  =  1LOVE2016 at check.

 

I hope you are having a sweet start to the lovely month of February.

~Melissa

You can find many of the Tasha Tudor books I mention in this post at her family’s site. They also have tickets available to tour Tasha’s house and gardens:

Tashatudorandgfamily.com

~All contents, photographs, are copyright@2016 by Melissa O’Connor

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